Xamarin Forms: Logging with anything from Console to SQLite

And it’s also logging the invoked method name, and the file name containing the method!

My Forms.RecurrenceToolkit NuGet package pack is now extended with logging functionality.

You can use the pre-written Console and SQLite logger without writing much code, or you can implement your own logger in a few lines, and use it instantly simultaneous with other loggers.

Install banditoth.Forms.RecurrenceToolkit.Logging.* packages, and enjoy the painless logging, and focus on the great ideas instead of being a copy paste robot. 🙂

Usage

In your App.xaml.cs, initalize the logger like:

LoggingProvider.Initalize(
	// If you have installed the console logger:
	new ConsoleLogger(),
	// If you have installed SQLite Logger:
	new SQLiteLogger()
	);

The logger is including the calling method’s name, and the .cs file name in the logs. You can access the logger from anywhere by calling these methods:

LoggingProvider.LogCritical("It's a critical message");
LoggingProvider.LogDebug("It's a debug message");
LoggingProvider.LogError("It's an error message");
LoggingProvider.LogException(new Exception(), "It's an exception");
LoggingProvider.LogInformation("It's an information message");
LoggingProvider.LogTrace("It's a trace message");
LoggingProvider.LogTrace(new StackTrace());
LoggingProvider.LogWarning("It's a warning message");

By default, the console and the SQLite logger logs exceptions in error level.

You can implement your own logger by deriving from BaseLogger class, like:

public class CustomLogger : BaseLogger
	{
		public CustomLogger() : base(new LoggerOptions()
		{
			IncludeCallerSourceFullFileName = true, // This will print C:/Users/Path/AssemblyFile.cs
			IncludeCallerSourceShortFileName = false, // This will print AssemblyFile.cs
			ExceptionLevel = Enumerations.LogLevel.Error, // The LogExceptions calls routed to log to the loglevel set.
			IncludeCallerMethodName = true // This can print the calling method's name
		})
		{

		}
		
		public override void LogCritical(string criticalMessage, string callerMethod, string filePath)
		{
			// Your own method
		}

		// .. File continues

Follow for more

https://github.com/banditoth/Forms.RecurrenceToolkit

Xamarin and Aspect Orientated Programming

I have started implementing my very first AOP like library, which is now available for testing in NuGet.org as a pre-release version.

This package is a part of my Xamarin.Forms Toolkit, and it is a good time to say thank you for using all of the three packages more than 500 times.
When I had published them, I thought the only user will be me. 🙂

In the first release of the package (1.0.0-pre-01), you can decorate your methods with attributes, in order to listen for Entering the method, and Exiting the method.

This can be handy for example, when you need to log your method invocations (Firebase analytics, Basic logging) or when you need to measure the elapsed time of the method run.

    [ConsoleYaay]
    public void BoringMethod()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(DateTime.Now);
    }

For example, the following code above will result the output below:

yaaay on enter!
2021. 05. 25. 16:56:01
yaaaay on exit

This can be achieved implementing IMethodDecorator class like this:

    [System.AttributeUsage(System.AttributeTargets.Method)]
    public class ConsoleYaay : Attribute, IMethodDecorator
    {
        public ConsoleYaay()
        {

        }

        public void OnEnter()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("yaaay on enter!");
        }

        public void OnExit()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("yaaaay on exit");
        }
    }

Try it in your project

Let’s jump to https://github.com/banditoth/Forms.RecurrenceToolkit/ to see the code, or https://www.nuget.org/packages/banditoth.Forms.RecurrenceToolkit.AOP/ to download it as a package

Future improvements

This package can be improved in a lot of aspects, so stay tuned for more details. Or just simply make a pull request with your ideas 🙂

Xamarin.Forms: Reopening application best pratices

If you have experienced that reopening your application from the phone’s app drawer or launcher is fails because it crashes your application, or displays the first set main page again instead of displaying the latest one, keep reading this article.

If you have crashes, or malfunctions, you are probably initializing something in the constructor of the App.xaml.cs, or in the overridden method called ‘OnStart’ like this:

        public App()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            InitalizeOnlyOnceClass.Initalize();
        }

        protected override void OnStart()
        {
            AnAnotherInitalizeOnlyOnceClass.Initalize();
        }

Imaginary InitalizeOnlyOnceClass’s Initialize method can be called only once, for the second call, it throws an exception. After you have started your program, sent to background, and bringing it back throws the second Initalization’s exception. This is because the App class gets constructed again when reopening application from the drawer.

To handle this, you should make a boolean for the application’s initialization progress.

        private static bool isInitalized;

        public App()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            if(isInitalized == false)
            {
                InitalizeOnlyOnceClass.Initalize();
            }
        }

If you receive a blank white screen, you are probably forget to set the Main Page

Make sure, that the Application.Current.MainPage always gets a value.
If you have implemented the Initialization by your self, or an another way, make sure you have handled correctly the else statement also.
Even if the application has been initialized once, the Application.Current.MainPage have to be set always when reconstructing the App.

Continue with the last page opened in the application

If you want to continue always with the last page opened, you need to store the last page always, when you are navigating from one to an another.

You can store the last page with making a class used for navigation, like this:

    public static class SimpleNavigationLogic
    {
        private static Xamarin.Forms.Page lastNavigatedPage;

        public static void ChangeMainPage(Xamarin.Forms.Page pageToSet)
        {
            Xamarin.Forms.Device.BeginInvokeOnMainThread(() =>
            {
                Application.Current.MainPage = pageToSet;
            });
            lastNavigatedPage = pageToSet;
        }

        public static void RestoreMainPage()
        {
            Xamarin.Forms.Device.BeginInvokeOnMainThread(() =>
            {
                Application.Current.MainPage = lastNavigatedPage;
            });
        }
    }

Than you can make the initialization for your application like this:

        public App()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            if(!isInitalized)
            {
                InitalizeOnlyOnceClass.Initalize();
                SimpleNavigationLogic.ChangeMainPage(new AwesomeMainPage());
            }
            else
            {
                SimpleNavigationLogic.RestoreMainPage();
            }
        }

Xamarin: How .NET MAUI will change the life of Xamarin.Forms development

.NET 6 and .NET MAUI is on the sill, but how will it affect the development of Xamarin applications?

For today, I have brought you a video by James Montemagno, a Xamarin developer working at Microsoft.

Follow James on the following platforms:

🌱 https://montemagno.com
🎙 https://mergeconflict.fm, https://blunders.fm, https://nintendodispatch.com
🦜 https://twitter.com/jamesmontemagno
🎥 https://youtube.com/jamesmontemagno

Xamarin.Forms : Using styles on custom UserControls

To use styles for your custom usercontrol, you have to define the styles TargetType property with an x:Type in your resource dictionary.

<ResourceDictionary
    xmlns="http://xamarin.com/schemas/2014/forms"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2009/xaml"
    xmlns:buttons="clr-namespace:AnAwesomeApp.Controls.Buttons"
    x:Class="AnAwesomeApp.Resources.Styles">

Declare the clr-namespace where your custom usercontrol lives.

<Style
        x:Key="BlueButtonStyle"
        TargetType="{x:Type buttons:ColoredButton}">
        <Setter
            Property="TextColor"
            Value="White" />
        <Setter
            Property="Color"
            Value="{AppThemeBinding Dark=#2325A6, Light=#61BAFF}" />
        <Setter
            Property="FontFamily"
            Value="Nunito" />
    </Style>

Set the target type with x:Type.

And boom, done!